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By / 12.6.2016

We in the US have been understandably obsessed with the outcome of the presidential election. But the rest of the world keeps moving forward. For example, last week Colombia ratified a historic peace treaty between the government and the rebel movement. PPI was privileged to be in Bogota just this October, where we held a […]

Blog

By / 12.1.2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 1, 2016 Contact: Cody Tucker, ctucker@ppionline.org or 202-775-0106 WASHINGTON—The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) today led a panel discussion at the 2016 NewDEAL Leaders Conference on strategies to ensure that all Americans have the education and skills to succeed in the rapidly changing 21st Century global economy. The panel was moderated by PPI President Will Marshall and featured panelists […]

Blog

By / 12.1.2016

Last year Graham Allison of Harvard wrote an article for the Atlantic entitled “The Thucydides Trap: Are the U.S. and China Headed for War?”  Allison noted that in 12 of 16 cases over the last 500 years in which there was a rapid shift in the relative power of a rising nation that threatened to […]

Blog

By / 12.1.2016

Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump’s pick to be his Secretary of Education, is often described as a champion of school choice. Progressives should know that she defines “school choice” in ways that undermine public accountability and blur the crucial distinction between public and private education. “We think of the educational choice movement as involving many parts: […]

Press Releases

By / 11.30.2016

WASHINGTON—The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) today released a new policy report, “Long-Term Carbon Pricing: The Great Swap,” at a packed public forum featuring a cross-partisan roundtable discussion with moderator Hannah Hess of E&E News and panelists John Larsen, Director of the Rhodium Group, Jerry Taylor, President of the Niskanen Center, Catrina Rorke, Director of energy […]

Project

Technological innovation is the main force driving job creation, productivity growth, and living standards. Progressives should aim to stimulate public and private investment in new enterprises and diffuse innovation across the entire economy.

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With Washington stalemated by partisanship and polarization, the most important governing innovations today are happening in America’s metro regions. PPI advocates for a new “progressive federalism” that decentralizes political power and resources to metro leaders.

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An open global economy boosts U.S. growth, supports good jobs, and enhances the buying power of American consumers. PPI advances policies that help American producers and workers to tap into global commerce, while assuring that trade’s substantial benefits are more broadly shared.

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America needs a 21st century model of public education geared to the knowledge economy. Charter schools are showing the way, because they provide autonomy for schools, accountability for results, and parental choice among schools tailored to the diverse learning styles of children.

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America’s civil justice system is a “public good” that should produce predictable, accurate and just results. The PPI Center for Civil Justice seeks to defend the integrity of our legal system from litigation abuse and efforts to bypass legislatures to make policy in the courts.

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Regulatory accumulation – the relentless layering of new rules atop old ones over decades – can smother economic innovation and investment. Continuously improving the regulatory environment for entrepreneurship and growth is integral to progressive efforts to make government work better.

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Government anti-poverty programs and charities must modernize the way they deliver social services. By embracing technological innovation, costly and time consuming bureaucratic barriers can be broken down and millions of disadvantaged Americans can become their own case managers.

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America must innovate its way to clean growth. Rejecting both climate denial and fantasies of 100 percent renewable power, we need a realistic transition to a low-carbon economy that taps next generation nuclear technology and carbon capture techniques as well as wind, solar and water power.