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By / 9.20.2017

Everyone knows that Chinese wages have soared in recent years. Factory pay is up 64% since 2011, according to one source. The yuan-dollar rate was 6.38 on September 20, 2011, compared to 6.57 today, virtually no change. So quick quiz. What do you think has happened to the price of imports from China since then? […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 9.18.2017

Phil Goldberg and Kathryn Constance discuss the impact that a recent Supreme Court decision could have on sanctions over discovery and other litigation disputes. The U.S. Supreme Court, in the little-known case Goodyear v. Haeger this past term, set important limits on a judge’s inherent authority sanctions, which could have significant implications in discovery disputes. […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 9.14.2017

Even as Congress passed $15 billion in initial funding for Hurricane Harvey relief, Americans were glued to their TVs watching Hurricane Irma, the strongest-ever Atlantic storm, bear down on Florida, where millions are still without power and other services. Sadly, Congress, and the rest of us, had better get used to it. Harvey and Irma […]

Blog

By / 9.8.2017

Based on newly revised Bureau of Economic Analysis data, we find that rising labor compensation for health care workers accounted for $55 billion, or 40%, of the increase in personal health care spending in 2016. By comparison, in May, 2017, we calculated that pharmaceuticals accounted for only $15 billion, or 11% of the rise in personal health care […]

Op-eds and Articles

By / 9.8.2017

On Sept. 8, 1992, the first charter school opened, in St. Paul, Minn. Twenty-five years later, some 7,000 of these schools serve about three million students around the U.S. Their growth has become controversial among those wedded to the status quo, but charters undeniably are effective, especially in urban areas. After four years in a […]

Project

Technological innovation is the main force driving job creation, productivity growth, and living standards. Progressives should aim to stimulate public and private investment in new enterprises and diffuse innovation across the entire economy.

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With Washington stalemated by partisanship and polarization, the most important governing innovations today are happening in America’s metro regions. PPI advocates for a new “progressive federalism” that decentralizes political power and resources to metro leaders.

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An open global economy boosts U.S. growth, supports good jobs, and enhances the buying power of American consumers. PPI advances policies that help American producers and workers to tap into global commerce, while assuring that trade’s substantial benefits are more broadly shared.

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America needs a 21st century model of public education geared to the knowledge economy. Charter schools are showing the way, because they provide autonomy for schools, accountability for results, and parental choice among schools tailored to the diverse learning styles of children. David Osborne’s book, Reinventing America’s Schools, explores the new paradigm of public education that is emerging to fit the realities of the 21st century.

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America’s civil justice system is a “public good” that should produce predictable, accurate and just results. The PPI Center for Civil Justice seeks to defend the integrity of our legal system from litigation abuse and efforts to bypass legislatures to make policy in the courts.

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Regulatory accumulation – the relentless layering of new rules atop old ones over decades – can smother economic innovation and investment. Continuously improving the regulatory environment for entrepreneurship and growth is integral to progressive efforts to make government work better.

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Government anti-poverty programs and charities must modernize the way they deliver social services. By embracing technological innovation, costly and time consuming bureaucratic barriers can be broken down and millions of disadvantaged Americans can become their own case managers.

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America must innovate its way to clean growth. Rejecting both climate denial and fantasies of 100 percent renewable power, we need a realistic transition to a low-carbon economy that taps next generation nuclear technology and carbon capture techniques as well as wind, solar and water power.